Monthly Archives: October 2011

More on Law School Practice Exams

Tuesday’s post on practice exams generated some questions over at the Volokh Conspiracy to which we think we can usefully respond. First, we should have made clear that no student’s exam answer will be posted on the Open Book website … Continue reading

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Do Profs Teach What Law School Exams Test?

We’ve been blogging over at the Volokh Conspiracy about law school exams and our new book Open Book: Succeeding on Exams from the First Day of Law School. In response to a post about how exams mirror law practice, several … Continue reading

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Law School Practice Exams

Everyone knows the old joke. A guy walking in New York City asks a woman: “How do I get to Carnegie Hall?” She responds, “Practice, Practice, Practice.” Practice make perfect. But how are law students supposed to practice for exams? … Continue reading

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Why Do Law School Exams Look the Way They Do?

With Halloween comes a scary prospect for law students and law professors alike. Exams! So it seems like a good time to ask: why do law school exams still center around issue-spotting questions? It certainly isn’t for the good of … Continue reading

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What’s The Right Way To Take Notes in Class?

John and I would like to introduce you to Nick Axelrod and Jonathan Bruno, two 2Ls who have been helping us with The Blog and The Commons. After we got some comments and questions about note-taking, they volunteered to write … Continue reading

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Webcast On Gearing Up For Exams

Last week John and I – joined by Claire Suni – did a webcast called “What’s Going on in Here, Anyway?” During that webcast we discussed why 1L professors teach as they do, and how that classroom experience relates to … Continue reading

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